Thursday, May 06, 2010

Thatcher Doesn't Get What Cameron is For.

It really says something about the campaign which David Cameron has run when even Margaret Thatcher can't work out what he actually stands for. But she has let it be known that she finds Cameron "boring".

Tim Bell: "She still says she doesn't really get him. If the Tory Party was not in her blood, Cameron as a leader would not get her vote."
And the lady who famously stated that, "There is no such thing as society" made it clear what irks her the most.

She feels particularly alienated by Cameron's adoption of the "big society" concept.

In a scathing analysis of Cameron's attempt to modernise Tory Party thinking, she said: "Conservatism used to be about pushing back the boundaries of the State." Bell - the adviser who helped propel her into Downing Street in 1979 - revealed Thatcher's judgments immediately after last Thursday's final televised leaders' debate in Birmingham.

She is unaware that Cameron doesn't mean anything when he states he wants a "big society". He just wants to distance himself from one of Maggie's most contentious phrases.

The difference between Thatcher and Cameron is that I was never in any doubt about where Thatcher stood on any issue, and she was always poles apart from where I stood.

Cameron is seeking power without stating where he stands on just about everything, and is issuing meaningless clich├ęs rather than substantive policies.

I can see why he would annoy Thatcher. Thatcher enjoyed saying things which appalled liberals.
No one would remember the Good Samaritan if he'd only had good intentions; he had money as well.
Margaret Thatcher
There is no such thing as society: there are individual men and women, and there are families.
Margaret Thatcher
"Margaret Thatcher once remarked that anybody over the age of 30 who used a bus could consider themselves a failure."
Source.
Appalling as Thatcher was, at least you knew where she stood on everything. Can't say that about "Dave".

Click here for full article.

No comments: